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Wheat

Triticum Aestivum

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Wheat (Triticum Aestivum) is a type of annual grass grown for its highly nutritious and useful grain. It is one of the top three most produced crops, along with corn and rice. The wheat grown in the United States falls into two categories: winter wheat, which is planted in the fall and matures in the summer, and spring wheat, which is planted after the danger of frost is over and also matures in the summer.

Though Washington farmers grow four classes of wheat, soft white wheat accounts for over 85 percent of total production. Two distinct types are grown: club and common. Club wheats have shorter, more compact heads than common types. The two are often marketed as a mixture called Western White, one of the world's most popular wheat mixes, available only from the Pacific Northwest. In addition, hard wheat classes are grown and include hard red winter, hard red spring, and hard white wheat (in limited production). 

Specifications

Packaging Options

Bulk loaded in 20 ft. and 40 ft. containers.
Grain can be loaded into bags/totes. 

Harvest/Yields

Spring Wheat — Spring wheat is planted in the late spring and harvested late in the summer. Annual rainfall in the Northern Great Plains and Northwestern States is relatively limited but well distributed during the summer, thus favoring spring wheat production. Planting can begin in March and last through May dependent on location and weather conditions. Harvest can begin in July and continue through September dependent on location. Yields vary by geographic location. The 2012 winter wheat crop year averaged 45 bushels/acre across 12.055 million acres.

Winter Wheat — Winter wheat, widely grown throughout the United States, is heavily concentrated in the central and Southern Great Plains and the Pacific Northwest. Winter wheat is planted in the fall, goes into dormancy during the winter, and is harvested for grain the following spring. Planting can begin in August and continue through December dependent on location and weather conditions. Harvest can begin in May and continue through September dependent on location. Yields vary by geographic location. The 2012 winter wheat crop year averaged 47.2 bushels/acre across 34.834 million acres.

Some content taken from: usda.mannlib.cornell.edu/usda/nass/planting/uph97.pdf and http://brownfieldagnews.com/2012/09/28/2012-wheat-production-up-13-from-2011